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electric car charging: autonomy or… mental load?

CHECK POINT

electric car charging: autonomy or… mental load?

The electric vehicle market is booming, but many people are reluctant to leave the world of internal combustion vehicles behind, fearing that they won’t find it easy to recharge the battery of their 100% electric car. Could the freedom of movement that the private car has represented for decades in the collective imagination be called into question by the advent of electric mobility? Is the fear of a loss of range justified or just assumed? It’s up to everyone to make up their own minds!

  • electric vehicle

electric recharging: the need not to be overestimated
★ ☆ ☆

In many Western countries, physical mobility is stagnating or even declining slightly, particularly in terms of the number of journeys made. In France, for example, a person makes an average of 2.8 physical trips per day, almost 99% of which are journeys of less than 80 kilometres. It is estimated that each journey covers an average of 9 kilometres. On these short journeys, the modal share of the car seems to have peaked around ten years ago, and now stands at around 64%.

99% of journeys are short

When you consider that an electric car like the Zoe E-Tech Electric has a WLTP range of almost 400 kilometres, it’s easy to see that the question of range doesn’t really arise in 99% of cases. By analysing your habits, you can find out what your real mobility needs are… and get rid of the fear of breakdowns, so that you can objectively reconsider switching to electric cars.

home charging point installation: autonomy par excellence
★ ★ ☆

What if you had your own petrol station at home? That’s what happens with an electric vehicle. More than 90% of electric or plug-in hybrid car recharging takes place at home or at work, in other words in a private place where you stay parked for a relatively long time. This is undoubtedly the most practical, but also the most economical. The price of electricity at home is lower than at public charging points. What’s more, home charging has the potential to be smart charging: the Mobilize Smart Charge application takes control of the timing of the charge to help balance the electricity network, so you can benefit from the cheapest, least carbon-intensive electricity possible. In this way, smart charging combines economy and ecology.

90% of electric vehicle charging takes place at home or at work

Whether you’re a private individual looking for a charging point at home, or a professional looking for one or more charging points in your company car park, Mobilize Power Solutions offers you optimised costs and maximum peace of mind. Everything is included, from analysis of charging requirements to maintenance and installation of the charging points, so that recharging an electric car is really simple.

electric charging points on the road: the challenge of access to public recharging
★ ★ ★

Journeys of more than 80 kilometres, which potentially require – more than short journeys – the use of a recharging point on the way, account for less than 2% of the number of journeys, particularly in France. The importance of this need for mobility should therefore be put into perspective. However, as the car makes an average of 73% of these long journeys, users of electrified vehicles are perfectly justified in looking for simple recharging solutions while roaming.

73% of long journeys are made by car

To meet this demand, professionals and public authorities are getting organised. There are now around 500,000 public charging points in Europe, and the targets for the deployment of new infrastructure are ambitious. In addition to the sheer number of charging points, the other challenge is to ensure that the operation lasts only a short time, so that you can recharge the battery of your electrified vehicle during a simple break. With 200 new fast-charging stations, Mobilize Fast Charge plans to do its bit.

urban mobility: more multimodality and less car use?

CHECK POINT

electric car charging: autonomy or… mental load?

The electric vehicle market is booming, but many people are reluctant to leave the world of internal combustion vehicles behind, fearing that they won’t find it easy to recharge the battery of their 100% electric car. Could the freedom of movement that the private car has represented for decades in the collective imagination be called into question by the advent of electric mobility? Is the fear of a loss of range justified or just assumed? It’s up to everyone to make up their own minds!

  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

electric recharging: the need not to be overestimated
★ ☆ ☆

In many Western countries, physical mobility is stagnating or even declining slightly, particularly in terms of the number of journeys made. In France, for example, a person makes an average of 2.8 physical trips per day, almost 99% of which are journeys of less than 80 kilometres. It is estimated that each journey covers an average of 9 kilometres. On these short journeys, the modal share of the car seems to have peaked around ten years ago, and now stands at around 64%.

99% of journeys are short

When you consider that an electric car like the Zoe E-Tech Electric has a WLTP range of almost 400 kilometres, it’s easy to see that the question of range doesn’t really arise in 99% of cases. By analysing your habits, you can find out what your real mobility needs are… and get rid of the fear of breakdowns, so that you can objectively reconsider switching to electric cars.

home charging point installation: autonomy par excellence
★ ★ ☆

What if you had your own petrol station at home? That’s what happens with an electric vehicle. More than 90% of electric or plug-in hybrid car recharging takes place at home or at work, in other words in a private place where you stay parked for a relatively long time. This is undoubtedly the most practical, but also the most economical. The price of electricity at home is lower than at public charging points. What’s more, home charging has the potential to be smart charging: the Mobilize Smart Charge application takes control of the timing of the charge to help balance the electricity network, so you can benefit from the cheapest, least carbon-intensive electricity possible. In this way, smart charging combines economy and ecology.

90% of electric vehicle charging takes place at home or at work

Whether you’re a private individual looking for a charging point at home, or a professional looking for one or more charging points in your company car park, Mobilize Power Solutions offers you optimised costs and maximum peace of mind. Everything is included, from analysis of charging requirements to maintenance and installation of the charging points, so that recharging an electric car is really simple.

electric charging points on the road: the challenge of access to public recharging
★ ★ ★

Journeys of more than 80 kilometres, which potentially require – more than short journeys – the use of a recharging point on the way, account for less than 2% of the number of journeys, particularly in France. The importance of this need for mobility should therefore be put into perspective. However, as the car makes an average of 73% of these long journeys, users of electrified vehicles are perfectly justified in looking for simple recharging solutions while roaming.

73% of long journeys are made by car

To meet this demand, professionals and public authorities are getting organised. There are now around 500,000 public charging points in Europe, and the targets for the deployment of new infrastructure are ambitious. In addition to the sheer number of charging points, the other challenge is to ensure that the operation lasts only a short time, so that you can recharge the battery of your electrified vehicle during a simple break. With 200 new fast-charging stations, Mobilize Fast Charge plans to do its bit.

urban mobility and car share

As mobility needs vary greatly, so do mobility solutions. Cities are innovating and becoming real mobility laboratories. One of the new forms of urban mobility to emerge is undoubtedly car-sharing, in particular car-sharing with no pick-up or drop-off points, i.e. free-floating car-sharing.

Carsharing’s playground coincides with the demotorisation of city centres, where people are less and less inclined to own a car. These places have several characteristics. Firstly, the density of shops and services, which means that people do not have a crucial need for a car on a daily basis ; but also the density of facilities, which makes it easier to access the shared car, whether on foot, by bike or by public transport. Car-sharing-friendly demotorisation sites also offer a variety of alternatives to the private car, particularly for commuting, thanks to the public transport network and/or the network of cycle paths. Finally, these are also places where finding parking is a real challenge. The lack of easy, affordable parking close to home or destination is likely to discourage car ownership and encourage new forms of urban mobility such as car-sharing.

And when you don’t want to drive yourself, whether to catch a train or get home from a party, a taxi or chauffeur-driven car is another alternative to the private car. Car-sharing, public transport, walking, cycling and other forms of soft mobility… the solutions are varied and easily accessible to city dwellers.

the suburban and modes of transport to be reinvented

While owning a private car remains essential the further you are from the city centre, alternatives are emerging that are helping to reduce the number of vehicles in multi-motorised households, in suburban areas as well as in small towns and rural areas. These include short-term car hire, the use of pools of service cars for private needs, car-sharing between private individuals and car-pooling. But that’s not all.

In response to motorists’ concerns about the day-to-day management, maintenance and resale of their vehicles, it is now possible to opt for a different approach, one that favours use over ownership: Vehicle-as-a-Service (VaaS). This approach is virtuous from the point of view of optimising resources, since it is based on the circular economy. It’s also easy to live with and in tune with the times: everyone benefits from a vehicle and a range of associated services, according to their needs at the time and with no commitment. It’s a new approach to motoring that goes beyond the car itself.

electric vehicle charging stations: where and when to charge your car?

bornes recharge electrique
GUIDEBOOK

electric vehicle charging stations: where and when to charge your car?

Service stations are part of the familiar landscape for filling up a combustion-powered car, particularly in suburban areas. Their architecture, signage and layout make them easy to spot and accessible to all motorists. But what about filling up an electric or rechargeable hybrid car? The solutions are both more diverse and less visible. Electric charging points have as many characteristics as they have types of location, and therefore types of use… Follow the guide.

  • electric vehicle

1) fast lane recharging stations: taking a break along the way

When they are installed on fast lanes, such as motorways or trunk roads, charging stations offer high power, of at least 43 kW, suitable for a short break. The Mobilize Fast Charge ultra-fast charging network will soon be offering 200 new stations across Europe, so there’s no need to worry about running out of power! Fast-charging stations can charge electric cars in less than thirty minutes, enough time to go from almost empty to almost full. That’s enough time for the driver, too, to recharge personal batteries before getting back on the road. Note that the cost of electricity delivered in this way is higher than that of a slower recharge, because the price per kW/h is closely linked to the power of the current.

 

Fast-charging infrastructures generally deliver direct current (DC), and electric vehicles designed for road use are equipped with DC chargers. For example, thanks to the high recharging power provided by their DC chargers, Renault E-TECH Electric, Megane and Zoe can be recharged as part of a natural journey. Whether you’re going on holiday or on a long business trip, long road journeys are punctuated by breaks that allow you to rest and have something to eat. On the motorway, fast charging of the Megane or Zoe E-TECH Electric makes the most of these stops to recover, in just a few minutes, enough range to reach the next stage or the final destination.

2) electric charging points in shopping centres: charging your car in hidden time

Why not fill up your electric car at the same time as your shopping? It’s all the more appealing because the charging points in the car parks of supermarkets and shopping centres are cheap or even free to use. For many retail chains, recharging electric cars is shaping up to be the “new wifi”, in other words, an essential service for their customers on a daily basis.

 

Retailers are already meeting this demand, or preparing to meet it, in a variety of ways: with conventional alternating current (AC) charging points, generally between 7 and 22 kW, and with fast direct current (DC) charging points, capable of releasing power in excess of 50 kW. The more powerful the charging point, the faster the recharging rate for the motorist, but the more expensive it is for the retailer to set up. The power for each chargepoint is therefore tailored to the average parking time at the site. By way of example, the Renault Megane E-TECH Electric recovers up to 160 kilometres of city driving in an hour’s charge on a 22 kW AC public charging point, while the Dacia Spring needs less than an hour to recharge to 80% on a 30 kW DC charging point.

3) on-street charging points for electric cars: recover range with every parking space

The figure of 400,000 public access charging points in Europe is impressive but conceal many geographical disparities. By expanding on-street charging networks, local authorities are playing an important role in the development of low-carbon mobility. Deploying these public infrastructures makes it easier for users of electric or hybrid vehicles to recharge their cars, especially city dwellers who have neither their own parking space nor – a fortiori – their own recharging solution. City centres offer opportunities for recharging on the street or in car parks, often with free parking. So you can use a meal in a restaurant or a shopping break to recharge the battery in your electric car. And for the future, Mobilize Iléo Concept is proposing an urban layout where you can recharge your vehicle while sitting out of the weather or in a heatwave.

 

The charging points for electric vehicles found on the public highway deliver alternating current (AC) with a power ranging from 7 to 22 kW. The Twingo E-TECH Electric simply takes a half-hour break connected to a 22 kW station to regain around 80 kilometres of range, and the Zoe E-TECH Electric recovers up to 125 kilometres of range in 2 hours of charging at an 11 kW station, for mixed journeys.

4) reinforced socket or wallbox: benefit from a home charging station

What could be nicer than not having to make a diversion to the service station or queue to fill up? With electric mobility, every private place can potentially be transformed into a “petrol station”, whether it’s the house where you live, the company building where you work or, why not, your grandparents’ house, where you spend the day. While plugging your car into a conventional power socket is not advisable, it’s easy to install a reinforced 3.2 kW socket, or even a wall-mounted charging point, also known as a “wallbox”, capable of delivering power ranging from 3.7 to 22 kW in alternating current (AC). Mobilize Power Solutions‘ services support both private individuals and professionals in the design, installation and maintenance of their own recharging solution.

 

The vast majority of electric car recharging is carried out at home, in private homes or shared ownership, with full recharging often taking place overnight. For a Dacia Spring, for example, it takes less than nine hours to charge from 0 to 100% on a 3.7 kW wallbox, and less than fourteen hours on a 2.3 kW domestic socket. The Renault Megane E-TECH Electric, meanwhile, recovers up to 400 kilometres in mixed driving in eight hours on a 7.4 kW wallbox. As well as the obvious convenience of this charging method, it’s also a particularly economical way of filling up. When you’ve got all night ahead of you, you can make do with a slow charge, i.e. low power… at a low cost! What’s more, home charging can be easily programmed to start when the electricity rate is at its lowest, if your contract includes off-peak hours. They can even take advantage of smart charging, which adjusts the rate at which the vehicle is charged according to the availability of electricity on the grid, so as to consume the least carbon-intensive and cheapest energy possible. The Mobilize Smart Charge application takes care of everything.

 

Mobilize offers recharging solutions to suit everyone’s day-to-day needs, from private individuals and businesses to mobility professionals in the car-sharing and chauffeur-driven car sectors. So electric mobility is a matter of course for everyone.

how the electric car is keeping pace with new forms of mobility

voiture electrique
LEVEL UP

how the electric car is keeping pace with new forms of mobility

Buy a car, enjoy it and maintain it for a few years, then change it? Objectively speaking, the traditional pattern of car ownership is not always the most attractive for the user. Not to mention the fact that it has a negative impact on natural resources. Car-sharing, on-demand transport, car-pooling… Solutions are emerging that are based on the “car” object, while going beyond the model of the individual car. To minimise running costs and environmental impact, the new forms of mobility are mainly electric.

  • electric vehicle
  • energy transition
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

★ ☆ ☆
the electric vehicle, an ally of car-sharing, short-term car hire and chauffeur-driven cars

Experiencing car-sharing often means discovering the advantages of electric mobility, given the over-representation of 100% electric vehicles in the car-sharing fleet. Whether it’s free-floating car-sharing, which is mainly found in large cities because the roads are so dense there, or car-sharing with pick-up and drop-off stations that can be likened to short-term hire accessible via a smartphone, car-sharing offers give pride of place to electric mobility. Mobilize is deploying a range of new mobility solutions, from car-sharing to short-term car hire, thanks to its Zity by Mobilize and Mobilize Share offers. Did you know that a vehicle remains parked on average 95% of the time, a quarter of which corresponds to parking outside the home? Electric car-sharing makes the most of these periods of immobility, because every time you park is potentially an opportunity to recharge your vehicle.

The chauffeur-driven car sector is also booming. It is expected to almost double in Europe over the next 10 years. Taxis and chauffeur-driven cars are particularly well represented in major conurbations. As a complement to urban public transport, they meet occasional needs for flexible, safe and comfortable transport. Companies in the sector, as well as self-employed drivers, are attracted by electric vehicles, in particular for reasons of low running costs. But also because an electric car can be used in city centres and Low Emission Zones (LEZ) reserved for the least polluting vehicles. A definite competitive advantage!

★ ★ ☆
electric mobility at the heart of the Mobility as a Service (MaaS) model

Watch any film or series at any time? Listen to an album or playlist under any circumstances? Stay informed via different channels depending on the time of day or week? Choose your meal and have it delivered within the hour? In many areas, everyone is gradually getting used to consuming everything on demand. Why should mobility be any different? Technological innovations, based on connectivity in general and the use of smartphones in particular, are opening up a whole new world of possibilities.

The traditional model of owning a private car can be seen as constraining, as it is associated with problems of maintenance, insurance, parking, etc. The freedom you feel at the wheel of your car could be overshadowed by the mental and financial burden you have to bear. Mobilize, the Renault Group brand dedicated to new forms of mobility, responds to this problem. The car – of course 100% electric – is designed as the central element of the offering, without purchase being the only means of acquisition. The Mobilize Duo micro-city car will be an example of this from 2024. Above all, the car is inseparable from a whole range of complementary services, including insurance, maintenance and vehicle charging. The package is marketed in the form of a subscription and can be adapted as the user’s needs change, for maximum flexibility.

★ ★ ★
the electric car, the symbol of clean motoring

The electric vehicle is therefore best suited to the new forms of mobility, which replace the notion of car ownership with the notion of car use. It is no longer a question of drawing on natural resources to manufacture a product, consuming that product and then throwing it away, according to the traditional model of the linear economy. This is where the principle of the circular economy comes into its own. The same vehicle is used by several people, and studies show that a car-sharing scheme replaces 5 to 8 private cars.

Electro-mobility is also closely linked to ecomobility. Despite the environmental impact of battery production, an electric car driven in Europe emits almost 3 times less greenhouse gases than an equivalent internal combustion vehicle throughout its life cycle. So, electric mobility is a significant lever in the fight against global warming.

With zero emissions on the move, excluding wear parts, the electric car emits no CO2… and its engine emits no pollutants either! This advantage is particularly valuable in cities, where traffic density and population density overlap. Modelling shows that electrifying 20% of the vehicle fleet in city centres reduces the concentration of volatile compounds by 45% and fine particles by 25%. The electric vehicle therefore has a role to play in both environmental and public health terms, particularly in terms of urban mobility.

chap. 2: the smartphone… towards ever more sustainable mobility

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

chap. 1: the smartphone… a mobility facilitator

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

electric charging: a new version of the game of 1000 miles

mobilize
GUIDEBOOK

electric charging: a new version of the game of 1000 miles

More ecological, more economical, more responsible: driving an electric car is undoubtedly a sensible choice for getting around. It also raises some questions. Among the most significant are questions about charging points. How to recharge the battery? Where to do it? Are all charging points the same? With all this, we’re reinventing the game 1000 Miles.

  • connectivity
  • electric vehicle

1) fast lane recharging stations: taking a break along the way

When they are installed on fast lanes, such as motorways or trunk roads, charging stations offer high power, of at least 43 kW, suitable for a short break. The Mobilize Fast Charge ultra-fast charging network will soon be offering 200 new stations across Europe, so there’s no need to worry about running out of power! Fast-charging stations can charge electric cars in less than thirty minutes, enough time to go from almost empty to almost full. That’s enough time for the driver, too, to recharge personal batteries before getting back on the road. Note that the cost of electricity delivered in this way is higher than that of a slower recharge, because the price per kW/h is closely linked to the power of the current.

 

Fast-charging infrastructures generally deliver direct current (DC), and electric vehicles designed for road use are equipped with DC chargers. For example, thanks to the high recharging power provided by their DC chargers, Renault E-TECH Electric, Megane and Zoe can be recharged as part of a natural journey. Whether you’re going on holiday or on a long business trip, long road journeys are punctuated by breaks that allow you to rest and have something to eat. On the motorway, fast charging of the Megane or Zoe E-TECH Electric makes the most of these stops to recover, in just a few minutes, enough range to reach the next stage or the final destination.

2) electric charging points in shopping centres: charging your car in hidden time

Why not fill up your electric car at the same time as your shopping? It’s all the more appealing because the charging points in the car parks of supermarkets and shopping centres are cheap or even free to use. For many retail chains, recharging electric cars is shaping up to be the “new wifi”, in other words, an essential service for their customers on a daily basis.

 

Retailers are already meeting this demand, or preparing to meet it, in a variety of ways: with conventional alternating current (AC) charging points, generally between 7 and 22 kW, and with fast direct current (DC) charging points, capable of releasing power in excess of 50 kW. The more powerful the charging point, the faster the recharging rate for the motorist, but the more expensive it is for the retailer to set up. The power for each chargepoint is therefore tailored to the average parking time at the site. By way of example, the Renault Megane E-TECH Electric recovers up to 160 kilometres of city driving in an hour’s charge on a 22 kW AC public charging point, while the Dacia Spring needs less than an hour to recharge to 80% on a 30 kW DC charging point.

3) on-street charging points for electric cars: recover range with every parking space

The figure of 400,000 public access charging points in Europe is impressive but conceal many geographical disparities. By expanding on-street charging networks, local authorities are playing an important role in the development of low-carbon mobility. Deploying these public infrastructures makes it easier for users of electric or hybrid vehicles to recharge their cars, especially city dwellers who have neither their own parking space nor – a fortiori – their own recharging solution. City centres offer opportunities for recharging on the street or in car parks, often with free parking. So you can use a meal in a restaurant or a shopping break to recharge the battery in your electric car. And for the future, Mobilize Iléo Concept is proposing an urban layout where you can recharge your vehicle while sitting out of the weather or in a heatwave.

 

The charging points for electric vehicles found on the public highway deliver alternating current (AC) with a power ranging from 7 to 22 kW. The Twingo E-TECH Electric simply takes a half-hour break connected to a 22 kW station to regain around 80 kilometres of range, and the Zoe E-TECH Electric recovers up to 125 kilometres of range in 2 hours of charging at an 11 kW station, for mixed journeys.

4) reinforced socket or wallbox: benefit from a home charging station

What could be nicer than not having to make a diversion to the service station or queue to fill up? With electric mobility, every private place can potentially be transformed into a “petrol station”, whether it’s the house where you live, the company building where you work or, why not, your grandparents’ house, where you spend the day. While plugging your car into a conventional power socket is not advisable, it’s easy to install a reinforced 3.2 kW socket, or even a wall-mounted charging point, also known as a “wallbox”, capable of delivering power ranging from 3.7 to 22 kW in alternating current (AC). Mobilize Power Solutions‘ services support both private individuals and professionals in the design, installation and maintenance of their own recharging solution.

 

The vast majority of electric car recharging is carried out at home, in private homes or shared ownership, with full recharging often taking place overnight. For a Dacia Spring, for example, it takes less than nine hours to charge from 0 to 100% on a 3.7 kW wallbox, and less than fourteen hours on a 2.3 kW domestic socket. The Renault Megane E-TECH Electric, meanwhile, recovers up to 400 kilometres in mixed driving in eight hours on a 7.4 kW wallbox. As well as the obvious convenience of this charging method, it’s also a particularly economical way of filling up. When you’ve got all night ahead of you, you can make do with a slow charge, i.e. low power… at a low cost! What’s more, home charging can be easily programmed to start when the electricity rate is at its lowest, if your contract includes off-peak hours. They can even take advantage of smart charging, which adjusts the rate at which the vehicle is charged according to the availability of electricity on the grid, so as to consume the least carbon-intensive and cheapest energy possible. The Mobilize Smart Charge application takes care of everything.

 

Mobilize offers recharging solutions to suit everyone’s day-to-day needs, from private individuals and businesses to mobility professionals in the car-sharing and chauffeur-driven car sectors. So electric mobility is a matter of course for everyone.

Mobilize Iléo Concept, the urban development that turns charging electric vehicles into a matter of course

KEYNOTE

Mobilize Iléo Concept, the urban development that turns charging electric vehicles into a matter of course

Recharging one’ s mobile phone, which has become an essential part of everyday life, is not a problem. Why should recharging a car be? Patrick Lecharpy, Mobilize Design Director, and Patrick Jouin, Urban Design Specialist, explain us how Iléo Concept was born out of the observation of the use of new forms of mobility, particularly electric and shared forms.

  • brand vision
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility

 

Mobilize offers an urban development concept that brings energy closer to where it is needed. Mobilize Iléo Concept not only allows you to recharge your car, but also to take advantage of this break to sit down, read, or enjoy a moment of conviviality, sheltered from the rain or heat. Easily identifiable from afar and harmoniously integrated into the city, this street furniture creates a real landscape.

Mobilize Share, car rental and car sharing in all circumstances

KEYNOTE

Mobilize Iléo Concept, the urban development that turns charging electric vehicles into a matter of course

Recharging one’ s mobile phone, which has become an essential part of everyday life, is not a problem. Why should recharging a car be? Patrick Lecharpy, Mobilize Design Director, and Patrick Jouin, Urban Design Specialist, explain us how Iléo Concept was born out of the observation of the use of new forms of mobility, particularly electric and shared forms.

  • brand vision
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility

 

Mobilize offers an urban development concept that brings energy closer to where it is needed. Mobilize Iléo Concept not only allows you to recharge your car, but also to take advantage of this break to sit down, read, or enjoy a moment of conviviality, sheltered from the rain or heat. Easily identifiable from afar and harmoniously integrated into the city, this street furniture creates a real landscape.

Mobilize Fast Charge, soon 200 charging stations for electrified vehicles in Europe

KEYNOTE

Mobilize Iléo Concept, the urban development that turns charging electric vehicles into a matter of course

Recharging one’ s mobile phone, which has become an essential part of everyday life, is not a problem. Why should recharging a car be? Patrick Lecharpy, Mobilize Design Director, and Patrick Jouin, Urban Design Specialist, explain us how Iléo Concept was born out of the observation of the use of new forms of mobility, particularly electric and shared forms.

  • brand vision
  • electric vehicle
  • energy transition

 

Mobilize offers an urban development concept that brings energy closer to where it is needed. Mobilize Iléo Concept not only allows you to recharge your car, but also to take advantage of this break to sit down, read, or enjoy a moment of conviviality, sheltered from the rain or heat. Easily identifiable from afar and harmoniously integrated into the city, this street furniture creates a real landscape.