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2030: What if the future of mobility was rural?

WHAT IF…

2030: What if the future of mobility was rural?

April 2030. The mass exodus of a whole generation deserting the city for the country has taken on such an importance that it has completely changed the face of the countryside. At the centre of this transformation is mobility, which for many means an electric vehicle that is no longer dominated by private use. Let’s imagine ourselves in this scenario, which has not a drop of science fiction about it! Rural mobility has become a central element to social cohesion and renewing rural areas, making great use of technical solutions, solidarity approaches and resource-sharing. And to prove it? Today we are witnessing the reopening of a village corner shop, which has plenty of ideas in store to make electric mobility breathe new life into the local area.

  • connectivity
  • transport on demand

The village had never been so busy! In any case, that’s what all the locals who have mostly spent their wholes lives here were saying. Nor did they ever think they’d see the day when the local corner shop would reopen its doors. The shop closed around the year 2000 because no one wanted to buy it. But finally, iIt has recently been repurchased by Ludivine and Paul, a young couple fleeing the city without wanting to give up on its modern comforts, with a firm ambition to make this spot the centre of community renewal. And today is its official opening.

reviving rural communities

The entire region has been undergoing a transformation over the past four years now. Despite being under threat of desertification as residents were still only yesterday moving away, today the region is an example of rural renaissance. If it feels sudden, this new energy is not due to chance. It’s the result local authorities persevering and a huge effort from businesses, which have managed to convince a whole population tired of the city and its amenities to settle in the region. Infrastructure development, support for remote workers, and the reopening of local services reopening have all gradually helped change the face of the countryside. And the evolution of means of mobility helped structure this profound transformation too.

the car and the countryside: friends for life

It must be said that the rural revival has for a long time come up against the question of transport, in a rural landscape where people live spaced out and far from one another, and where the population density makes public transport unsuitable. The private-use car generally remains the main means of transport and represents a substantial part of one’s budget for the rural population, for whom access to a vehicle is determined by the cost of purchase, maintenance and high fuel prices.

1403011-sysyhbu59k-preview
 
“One observation is clear: the region’s stability can now only be imagined as part of a fundamental reflection about how people can get about.”
 

And the local economic and political actors have been able to act on this wisely. In a way, those who have come today to the inauguration of the corner shop are witnesses as much as actors of change.

technical, yet social innovation

Mobility has transformed by both desire and necessity into a deeply united gesture that is no longer about people getting about individually, but rather getting about collectively. It aims at bringing accessibility to isolated homes, connecting people and revitalising villages threatened with desertion. Shared and carbon-free mobility solutions are leading to an unprecedented movement in terms of technological, but also social innovation. Some are being lead by local authorities, others stem from individual initiatives driven by civic sense and the needs of a generation of “neo-rurals” still connected to urban lifestyles. As such, a large number of sharing platforms have naturally emerged, often promoted by local businesses, developing car-sharing and vehicle pooling solutions. On top of this there are on-demand vehicle and short-term rental services, which had so far failed to develop in rural areas purely for logistical reasons. Mobility, driven by determined local businesses and digital tools, is once again becoming a powerful lever of solidarity. Especially since the digital satellite network rollout has helped to eliminate the last phone coverage dead zones across the region and to make internet access universal once and for all.

meet you at the charging station

The reopening of the village corner shop is part of this dynamism. For Ludivine and Paul, it’s now about making this local business a solution to the main barrier in electric vehicle adoption in rural areas: the issue being range and the availability of an electric charging network. Battery storage capacity has greatly improved, thus already solving part of the problem – which leaves the network. With their corner shop, the new owners want to actively participate in a movement implemented a few years earlier in the countryside, aimed at increasing the number of charging stations available in the region. Their corner shop has therefore been designed as a mobility hub, equipped with two fast charging stations and, when required, a space for returning vehicles on demand. So not only do you come to the shop to stock up on food, but also to charge your car’s battery. It’s also a way of attracting tourists and encouraging them to stop off for a while, to grab a coffee, read the local papers and chat with the locals about the things to see in the region. It’s a way of maintaining social ties and making the region more attractive . It’s a virtuous circle that is part of an entire ecosystem.

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social garages are the new third place

A few months earlier, a social garage opened in an old agricultural warehouse in the village. It’s run by Andia, who used to be an electrician but has since retrained in electric vehicle maintenance. Based on the same principle of a community bicycle repair workshop, the garage enables those with few resources to find the suitable equipment to maintain their vehicle at a lower cost and to be trained, if necessary, by a professional mechanic. Andia currently employs five full-time employees and the garage now houses a mobility hub where you can rent utility and agricultural vehicles for very short periods, as well as a pooling system for both shared vehicles and even bicycles! The whole package completes the nearby corner shop’s offer, enriching this ecosystem just a little bit more.

the countryside, but better

This concentration of mobility services is a fundamental movement inseparable from rural renewal. Mobility innovation has opened up new opportunities for building social ties. Moreover, the emergence of such mobility hubs in villages are now a common sight, housing both charging stations and other services, such as a fleet of shared vehicles or carpooling pick-up points. These hubs are also frequently combined with parcel drop-off and concierge lockers. Electric mobility is gradually changing the very face of the villages it touches – and for the better. Driven by this new dynamism, restaurants, bakeries and hairdressers are gradually repopulating the village centres that they had formerly abandoned due to a lack of visitors. Electric mobility is the main vector for rural renewal and for breathing life back into local areas. In a way, the car has once again become the driving force behind social cohesion and freedom that it always wanted to be.

urban mobility: more multimodality and less car use?

CHECK POINT

urban mobility: more multimodality and less car use?

Urbanisation is a fundamental trend that no region of the world seems to be escaping. Synonymous with development, it also brings with it its share of problems, in terms of environmental health, quality of life, mobility… On this last point, could the private car be its own worst enemy?

  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

modes of transport at the heart of urban mobility

As its name suggests, urban mobility covers all forms of mobility in urban areas, both within the city itself and in the inner and outer suburbs. It therefore covers a wide range of situations, whether in the town centre, the outskirts or the peri-urban areas. The conurbation extends in concentric circles: the wider the perimeter, the lower the density of population and infrastructure.

New territorial structures are developing, giving rise to new mobility needs and therefore new means of transport. While the private car remains synonymous with mobility, it is not the only solution for meeting the economic, societal and cultural needs of an increasingly diverse population.

urbanisation, its opportunities and challenges

Since the 1980s, the number and size of cities around the world have grown. Increasingly populated, the largest cities concentrate economic, political and cultural assets. The movement of people, financial exchanges and information flows are facilitated within the conurbation, but also between each of them. Some metropolises, such as New York, London, Tokyo and Paris, have global influence. We are even seeing the emergence of true megacities, vast urbanised regions that link the major cities together.

Today, 56% of the world’s population lives in cities, and cities generate more than 80% of the world’s Gross Domestic Product. This proportion is growing steadily. Studies predict that the number of city-dwellers will double by 2050. In that time, almost 7 out of every 10 people in the world will be living in an urban environment.

The power of cities to attract people is immense, but that doesn’t mean the problems associated with them should be forgotten: air pollution, recurring heatwaves, lack of security, etc. For local residents, the challenges of urbanisation also extend to the most basic quality of life, given the potentially numerous nuisances caused by population density. To deal with this, decision-makers and citizens are working to rethink the city in depth.

a single megacity for a variety of mobility needs

Within a large city, lifestyles differ greatly depending on whether you live in the centre or on the outskirts. To take the example of the Île-de-France megalopolis (Paris region, France), journeys involving Paris intra-muros – whether to the point of departure, the point of arrival or both – represent 30% of journeys in the region, but account for only 10% of car journeys in the region. The modal share of the car is therefore 3 times lower than in the rest of the megalopolis. This trend is confirmed by an analysis of car ownership. In Paris itself, 60% of households do not own a car; in the inner suburbs, 24% do not; and in the outer suburbs, only 9% do.

City centres benefit from a density of infrastructure that is particularly practical for everyday use. The distances between each point of interest are therefore relatively short. Add to this the fact that these areas are well served by public transport, and it’s easy to see why city dwellers have little need to use the car for journeys into the city centre. What’s more, with the proliferation of traffic restrictions, notably the Low Emission Zones, the private car – especially the internal combustion engine – is no longer welcome.

However, this disaffection with the private car needs to be put into perspective. In Europe, town centres are tending to lose their population, with more and more of them being used for recreational, cultural or tourist purposes, and less and less for traditional, long-term residential purposes. With a current population of 2.1 million, Paris has lost almost 123,000 inhabitants in 10 years. The majority of Parisians who leave the capital settle in the Île-de-France region, first in the inner suburbs and then in the outer suburbs. In absolute terms, the number of people affected by the absence of a private car decreases as the number of people affected by the use of a private car increases.

urban mobility and car share

As mobility needs vary greatly, so do mobility solutions. Cities are innovating and becoming real mobility laboratories. One of the new forms of urban mobility to emerge is undoubtedly car-sharing, in particular car-sharing with no pick-up or drop-off points, i.e. free-floating car-sharing.

Carsharing’s playground coincides with the demotorisation of city centres, where people are less and less inclined to own a car. These places have several characteristics. Firstly, the density of shops and services, which means that people do not have a crucial need for a car on a daily basis ; but also the density of facilities, which makes it easier to access the shared car, whether on foot, by bike or by public transport. Car-sharing-friendly demotorisation sites also offer a variety of alternatives to the private car, particularly for commuting, thanks to the public transport network and/or the network of cycle paths. Finally, these are also places where finding parking is a real challenge. The lack of easy, affordable parking close to home or destination is likely to discourage car ownership and encourage new forms of urban mobility such as car-sharing.

And when you don’t want to drive yourself, whether to catch a train or get home from a party, a taxi or chauffeur-driven car is another alternative to the private car. Car-sharing, public transport, walking, cycling and other forms of soft mobility… the solutions are varied and easily accessible to city dwellers.

the suburban and modes of transport to be reinvented

While owning a private car remains essential the further you are from the city centre, alternatives are emerging that are helping to reduce the number of vehicles in multi-motorised households, in suburban areas as well as in small towns and rural areas. These include short-term car hire, the use of pools of service cars for private needs, car-sharing between private individuals and car-pooling. But that’s not all.

In response to motorists’ concerns about the day-to-day management, maintenance and resale of their vehicles, it is now possible to opt for a different approach, one that favours use over ownership: Vehicle-as-a-Service (VaaS). This approach is virtuous from the point of view of optimising resources, since it is based on the circular economy. It’s also easy to live with and in tune with the times: everyone benefits from a vehicle and a range of associated services, according to their needs at the time and with no commitment. It’s a new approach to motoring that goes beyond the car itself.

how the electric car is keeping pace with new forms of mobility

voiture electrique
LEVEL UP

how the electric car is keeping pace with new forms of mobility

Buy a car, enjoy it and maintain it for a few years, then change it? Objectively speaking, the traditional pattern of car ownership is not always the most attractive for the user. Not to mention the fact that it has a negative impact on natural resources. Car-sharing, on-demand transport, car-pooling… Solutions are emerging that are based on the “car” object, while going beyond the model of the individual car. To minimise running costs and environmental impact, the new forms of mobility are mainly electric.

  • electric vehicle
  • energy transition
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

★ ☆ ☆
the electric vehicle, an ally of car-sharing, short-term car hire and chauffeur-driven cars

Experiencing car-sharing often means discovering the advantages of electric mobility, given the over-representation of 100% electric vehicles in the car-sharing fleet. Whether it’s free-floating car-sharing, which is mainly found in large cities because the roads are so dense there, or car-sharing with pick-up and drop-off stations that can be likened to short-term hire accessible via a smartphone, car-sharing offers give pride of place to electric mobility. Mobilize is deploying a range of new mobility solutions, from car-sharing to short-term car hire, thanks to its Zity by Mobilize and Mobilize Share offers. Did you know that a vehicle remains parked on average 95% of the time, a quarter of which corresponds to parking outside the home? Electric car-sharing makes the most of these periods of immobility, because every time you park is potentially an opportunity to recharge your vehicle.

The chauffeur-driven car sector is also booming. It is expected to almost double in Europe over the next 10 years. Taxis and chauffeur-driven cars are particularly well represented in major conurbations. As a complement to urban public transport, they meet occasional needs for flexible, safe and comfortable transport. Companies in the sector, as well as self-employed drivers, are attracted by electric vehicles, in particular for reasons of low running costs. But also because an electric car can be used in city centres and Low Emission Zones (LEZ) reserved for the least polluting vehicles. A definite competitive advantage!

★ ★ ☆
electric mobility at the heart of the Mobility as a Service (MaaS) model

Watch any film or series at any time? Listen to an album or playlist under any circumstances? Stay informed via different channels depending on the time of day or week? Choose your meal and have it delivered within the hour? In many areas, everyone is gradually getting used to consuming everything on demand. Why should mobility be any different? Technological innovations, based on connectivity in general and the use of smartphones in particular, are opening up a whole new world of possibilities.

The traditional model of owning a private car can be seen as constraining, as it is associated with problems of maintenance, insurance, parking, etc. The freedom you feel at the wheel of your car could be overshadowed by the mental and financial burden you have to bear. Mobilize, the Renault Group brand dedicated to new forms of mobility, responds to this problem. The car – of course 100% electric – is designed as the central element of the offering, without purchase being the only means of acquisition. The Mobilize Duo micro-city car will be an example of this from 2024. Above all, the car is inseparable from a whole range of complementary services, including insurance, maintenance and vehicle charging. The package is marketed in the form of a subscription and can be adapted as the user’s needs change, for maximum flexibility.

★ ★ ★
the electric car, the symbol of clean motoring

The electric vehicle is therefore best suited to the new forms of mobility, which replace the notion of car ownership with the notion of car use. It is no longer a question of drawing on natural resources to manufacture a product, consuming that product and then throwing it away, according to the traditional model of the linear economy. This is where the principle of the circular economy comes into its own. The same vehicle is used by several people, and studies show that a car-sharing scheme replaces 5 to 8 private cars.

Electro-mobility is also closely linked to ecomobility. Despite the environmental impact of battery production, an electric car driven in Europe emits almost 3 times less greenhouse gases than an equivalent internal combustion vehicle throughout its life cycle. So, electric mobility is a significant lever in the fight against global warming.

With zero emissions on the move, excluding wear parts, the electric car emits no CO2… and its engine emits no pollutants either! This advantage is particularly valuable in cities, where traffic density and population density overlap. Modelling shows that electrifying 20% of the vehicle fleet in city centres reduces the concentration of volatile compounds by 45% and fine particles by 25%. The electric vehicle therefore has a role to play in both environmental and public health terms, particularly in terms of urban mobility.

from green mobility to sustainable transport, solutions are emerging

mobilite durable
REBOOT

from green mobility to sustainable transport, solutions are emerging

Green mobility is increasingly establishing itself as a credible alternative to the private car. But is it as simple, flexible and synonymous with freedom as its rival? A whole range of green mobility options are emerging to cover as many uses as possible. There are several ways of reducing the environmental impact of our journeys.

  • energy transition
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

green mobility: a growing family

Originally, the definition of green mobility was simple. It encompassed all forms of non-motorised mobility, i.e. modes of travel that depend on physical activity. It was then broadened to include all forms of mobility that are alternatives to the private car.

Green mobility therefore includes active forms of mobility such as walking and cycling. It also includes innovations stemming from electric mobility, such as battery-powered bicycles, electric scooters, unicycles and hoverboards. In these cases, the driving energy is not provided solely, if at all, by physical effort. Today, new forms of mobility of sustainable transport such as car-sharing and car-pooling are also part of green mobility.

What do they have in common? Compared with the private car or thermal public transport, they reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollutants when driving… as well as noise and odour pollution. Green mobility and sustainable mobility, also called “eco-mobility” are one and the same. Not to mention the fact that active mobility is also good for your health, helping to rebalance a lifestyle that is often sedentary.

sustainable transport and short journeys: the ideal marriage

Less pollution and less noise. It’s everything city dwellers can dream of, especially in city centres and narrow streets that are rapidly becoming congested with car traffic. Sustainable transport, whether active or electric, is ideal for covering short distances. The city is therefore their most obvious playground. City dwellers use green mobility mainly for journeys of less than 2 kilometres. They make it possible to get from A to B more efficiently than by car, because they avoid many of the problems of traffic jams and parking.

Beyond this short average distance, the public transport network in the city is efficient enough for you to opt for the bus, metro or tram. Green mobility therefore complements public transport. And their uses can even be combined: it’s not unusual to see someone getting on the bus with an electric scooter slung over their shoulder.

new forms of individual mobility: a cohabitation to be invented

It’s not always easy to reconcile these different modes of transport. On pavements, walking remains the most widespread form of green mobility. However, pedestrians have to share this precious space with rollerbladers, skateboards and motorless scooters… As for cycle paths, they are no longer used only by bicycles. They also include all kinds of electric vehicles (scooters, hoverboards, gyropods, monowheels, light mopeds, etc.).

Safety concern is a corollary of the boom in these “personal mobility devices”, as this new form of individual sustainable transport is sometimes mislabelled as “soft mobility”. To avoid an increase in the number of accidents, electric mobility devices in built-up areas should only be used on cycle paths and by drivers aged 12 or over. Outside built-up areas, they may be authorised on roads with an 80km/h speed limit, in which case the user must wear a helmet, reflective equipment and ride with the parking lights on.

green mobility and more demanding journeys: a response for every need

While many city dwellers are happy with active mobility and personal mobility devices, these solutions are not suitable for everyone, or for all uses. Must you catch the 8.10am flight loaded down with big suitcases? Need to bring home the furniture you’ve just bought? Having trouble walking? The private car is no longer the only solution for these special cases.

For journeys within the city or to the suburbs, other mobility services are taking over, such as taxis and chauffeur-driven cars, or car-sharing vehicles. Zity by Mobilize, the 100% electric car-sharing service, is present in the major cities of France, Spain and Italy. Its mobile application and free-floating access (i.e. no pick-up or drop-off stations) mean that anyone can find a vehicle close to their point of departure, and park it close to their point of arrival after use.

People who need to travel longer distances or to places with less public transport can also find alternatives to the traditional pattern of owning a private car. Away from the major conurbations, car-sharing take the form of short-term rental services, such as Mobilize Share. And let’s not forget car-pooling, which can be arranged efficiently for commuting to work, as well as for more exceptional and longer journeys.

chap. 2: the smartphone… towards ever more sustainable mobility

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

chap. 1: the smartphone… a mobility facilitator

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • electric vehicle
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

tomorrow, rethinking the cities in depth

REBOOT

tomorrow, rethinking the cities in depth

Too densely populated, too hot and too polluted. The cities of today are no longer aligned with current social and environmental issues. The time has come to adapt rather than simply observe. Cities must be updated to focus on mobility, connectivity and sustainability. The good news is that, generally, the solutions are already out there! But they require a fundamental rethink of how cities are designed. By developing a mobility and energy transition strategy that goes beyond the traditional car, Mobilize aims to play an active role in the positive evolution of cities, in “reboot” mode.

  • energy transition
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

REBOOT 1: soothing the urban spaces

As the cities of tomorrow will no longer accommodate large flows of traffic, part of the space previously given over to cars will be redistributed to meet different needs. This reallocation will accelerate the decarbonization of travel, in particular with the development of cycle paths and infrastructure for storing and maintaining bicycles, parking and recharging spaces for electric vehicles, parcel storage facilities, pedestrian walkways, etc.

This reclaimed street space will open up a number of possibilities for the greening of areas, whereas trees and other shrubbery can also be used to bring nature to other forms of open space, such as rooftops or alcoves. The greening of urban spaces has multiple benefits. It helps to control air pollution, promotes the return of biodiversity to cities and creates shady, cool islands in hot weather. As a result, the use of air conditioning, which is harmful to the environment, decreases both in buildings and cars. The use of photovoltaic shading systems over parking areas, which shelter cars from the sun’s rays while recharging their batteries, also has an impact on maintaining this “temperate city”.

REBOOT 2: meeting every mobility need

Many obstacles prevent seamless and stress-free travel in cities, such as being stuck in traffic jams, looking for a parking space for a long time once you arrive at your destination, or having to pay fixed costs for your car whatever the circumstances. The development of multimodal transport solutions, via increasingly extensive public transport and soft mobility services, can address these issues. However, this is not the only solution.

The “Vehicle as a Service” (VaaS) model offers an effective and complementary response. The private car is no longer the be-all-and-end-all of transport. With VaaS, customers can select the vehicle best suited to their needs, by purchasing, leasing or car-sharing, and can opt – just as flexibly – for exclusive services to simplify their lives, as well as reducing their costs and carbon footprint. Public transport or cycles for commuting, a compact electric car for effortless door-to-door travel, a hybrid family car for a long trip as a group, etc. Mobility services should be flexible, both when travelling around the city and beyond its limits.

REBOOT 3: optimizing daily life through data

The cities of tomorrow will be smart: a city made “intelligent” through effective data management, with a view to providing services to people. With real-time mapping of the use of public space, the different local stakeholders can better tailor their solutions to users’ needs, whether in terms of mobility, energy, cleanliness, or safety, etc. For example, when applied to mobility services, if companies are aware of the traffic flows in a given place and at a given time, they can model the situation and develop a range of services that will improve the experience for everyone.

Data also has a crucial role to play in balancing the electricity grid, in order to maximize the use of low-carbon, renewable energy in the city’s energy mix. Smart charging of electric vehicles is a perfect example. The car and the electrical grid are connected via the charging station and a smartphone app – the car is charged at a time when electricity is most available on the grid, i.e. when it is the cheapest and least carbon-intensive. Conversely, when demand for electricity from the grid is greater than the overall supply, charging of the vehicle is suspended. If using a bi-directional charging system, the vehicle can even return electricity to the grid, avoiding the need to produce electricity from fossil fuels. In this way, data can be used to improve user comfort and to drive forward the energy transition.

REBOOT 4: pooling resources

In the dense and geographically-constrained areas that constitute cities, the sharing of spaces and services is both the preferable and easier option. Sharing resources is already a given in an urban environment. Cramped housing provides limited facilities to meet basic needs. To satisfy ever more diverse expectations, city residents are making the most of public space or “third places”. The rise in remote working and mobile professions is driving the creation of shared “co-working” spaces, and leisure activities and entertainment are consumed in many dedicated common spaces, etc.

In terms of mobility, people in the city are rarely far away from a transport service. Shared use of cars, bikes and scooters is a convenient solution, whether vehicles are left at drop-off stations or on the street after use. With a simple smartphone, anyone can locate the most appropriate mode of transport available in the immediate vicinity. In some cases, a smartphone is also used as a pass to operate the vehicle and pay for the journey. Sharing urban spaces and services provides a flexible solution to a wide range of needs.

Smooth, mobile, connected, shared… life will be enriching in the cities of tomorrow! Cities must strike a balance between individual benefits – in particular, consumption “on demand” – and the collective benefits of protecting the environment public health, etc. Mobilize already has solutions: a reboot to move towards simpler, more resilient, and more collective transport services, where citizens are free from the shackles of personal cars and can actively contribute to achieving carbon neutrality within the city.

[chap.2] the mobility design

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • design
  • shared mobility
  • energy storage
  • energy transition
  • transport on demand
  • electric vehicle

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

[chap.1] the car design

ARTEFACT

the smartphone
[chap. 2] towards ever more sustainable mobility

Artefact is the video series conceived by Mobilize that tells the story of mobility through its objects.

Discover the episode focused on the Swiss army knife of modern times, the smartphone. Artefact shows us how it facilitates mobility, but also how it optimises it, including reducing its impact on the environment.

  • connectivity
  • design
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

 

The episode about the smartphone and mobility is divided into two videos. Here, in the second chapter, Artefact explains how the smartphone is not just a new compass for everyone’s mobility needs. Its connected nature makes it a pillar of data exchange, in real time and on a large scale. Optimising recharging of electric cars, encouraging shared use… The smartphone contributes to maximising the benefits of mobility and limiting its negative impacts on ecosystems.

 

 

Previously, in the first chapter, Artefact explained the smartphone’s role in a seamless mobile experience…

 

the smartphone
[chap. 1] a mobility facilitator

The smartphone is above all that little companion that we all have in our pocket and can no longer do without. Finding a recharging station on the way, renting or sharing a car, hailing a taxi or booking a chauffeur-driven car… The smartphone helps meet all kinds of mobility needs.

watch the video

individual mobility: a change of gear

mobilité individuelle mobilize
REBOOT

individual mobility: a change of gear

The transport landscape has never been quite as dynamic as it is today. The vast range of transport solutions and mobility apps that are currently available now allow everyone to take the driving seat when embarking on a journey. Real-life Mario Kart game, anyone?! Car subscription services, on-demand rental, multimodal transport solutions, shared mobility… What matters most is no longer the type of transport we choose, but rather the effect our travel decisions have on easing traffic congestion and in turn reducing the associated greenhouse gas emissions. Keen to secure pole position in the race to travel more sustainably? Mobilize offers a range of solutions that are guaranteed to be right up your street! Time for a closer look.

  • brand vision
  • shared mobility
  • transport on demand

Zity by Mobilize: the any time, any place urban car-sharing service

Based on the ‘free floating’ principle, which allows vehicles to be dropped off and picked up anywhere at all, Zity gives drivers access to 1,300 all-electric self-service vehicles (Renault Zoés and Dacia Springs) scattered around the streets of several major European cities, including Madrid, Paris, Lyon and Milan. Short-term car-sharing has never been so easy! Because Zity by Mobile is also an application to locate, book, unlock and return a vehicle, all with a simple tap of the screen.

Mobilize Share: the country-wide flexible car-sharing solution

Need a vehicle for 1 hour, 1 day or 1 month? Renting a vehicle that suits your ad hoc needs is easy with the Mobilize Share app. Car-share vehicles can be picked up from numerous designated locations that are part of the Renault Group network… meaning there’s sure to be one somewhere nearby! This means that any trip can be managed without hassle-free!

Bipi: the “on-demand” personal car rental service

Built around the principle of a platform that provides access to a vast range of vehicles, Bipi allows users to swap their car at will to suit their current needs and desires. The monthly subscription is all-inclusive, covering the rental charge, insurance, maintenance, assistance, etc. It can be easily managed and adjusted online as and when required. Offering a brand-new approach to the way cars are used, Bipi gives everyone easy access to the perfect individual mobility solution without having to buy a car.

Mobilize Fleet Monitoring: your corporate car fleet at a glance

The Mobilize Fleet Connect Iris Live service is a fully integrated car fleet management system that allows fleet managers to keep a watchful eye on their vehicles by giving them real-time remote access to all the data each vehicle has generated. It offers the perfect way of tracking each car’s usage rate, calculating fuel consumption, and assessing the ageing of each fleet… enabling fleet managers to make better informed decisions.

Mobilize Driver Solutions: the all-inclusive solution for chauffeurs

For 3 months or 3 years, Driver Solutions gives private chauffeurs and taxi drivers access to the Mobilize Limo, an all-electric luxury sedan accompanied by a full range of related services that can be tailored to their requirements: maintenance, insurance, guarantees, etc. The aim? Encourage professional drivers to sign up for the Mobilize package rather than buying a vehicle themselves, with a view to simplifying their business and making it more cost-effective.

Mobilize Duo and Bento: a new take on cars

Veritable urban micro-vehicles, the Duo and Bento provide a brand-new, all-electric and connected way to get from A to B. The Duo is a two-seater quadricycle that can nip around the city streets with ease. Both a car-sharing version and a no-licence version will be available when the solution is launched at the end of 2023. The Bento is the utility version that is due to hit the market in 2024. This particular model boasts a 700-litre box on the back, making it the perfect solution for last-mile deliveries. Constraint-free urban mobility at its best! Just like the Limo, the Duo and Bento will not be available for purchase: they will be marketed as a subscription package that includes a comprehensive range of services.